Monday, February 13, 2017

Bookish thoughts...

On Wives and Daughters.
I still haven't read this Elizabeth Gaskell novel, but I did see the BBC version of it a couple of weekends ago, and I really enjoyed it. The characters are great, especially Roger and Molly. In fact, Molly reminded me a lot of Fanny Price, Jane Austen's unheralded heroine from Mansfield Park. I even liked Cynthia, Molly's outspoken and flirtatious step-sister. Sometimes a good movie-version of a book makes me feel like I no longer need to read it, but this one just made me want to read the book even more.



On books and art.
You know I love me some art, especially when it's bookish art, which is why I do an art post every month. And why I couldn't resist buying this book:  Women Who Read Are Dangerous written by Stefan Bollman. It is full of amazing art with paintings by a variety of artists from Charles Burton Barber to James Tissot. Every page offers a different painting of a woman reading. So, if you want to see some great art, check this book out. Or just stay tuned ... I'll be posting some of my favorites in the coming months.




On reading to your children.
In Amanda Ripley's well-written and well-researched The Smartest Kids in the World, she makes this statement:  "When children were young, parents who read to them every day or almost every day had kids who performed much better in reading all around the world....Read to your kids!....Could it be that simple? Yes, it could."  Just something to think about.

Happy Reading!

14 comments:

  1. I love Wives and Daughters. Both the book and the movie are great! You do know the book doesn't end, right? The author passed away before finishing. You get where she was going but it's a bit frustrating that there's no ending. That's why I enjoy the movie more.
    If I have kids I plan on reading to them.

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    1. Someone told me that she never got a chance to end the book; it's too bad. I wonder where she would have taken her characters if she'd had more time.

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  2. I want that book :) I've heard so many great things about Wives and Daughters - definitely need to check it out (the book and movie). I I were to have children, I would definitely read to them and fill their rooms with books :)

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  3. Reminds me of the poem "The Reading Mother" by Strickland Gilliland which ends "Richer than I you could never be--I had a Mother who read to me." My dad read to me lots, and actually taught me to read. Great reminder to all parents! I LOVE the art book you shared. I will have to check that out.

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    1. It's the coolest art book ever. :)

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  4. I haven't read anything by Gaskell, but your review makes me want to watch the film and read the book! Great quote--one I believe in. :)

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  5. I do enjoy reading to my daughter. :-) She seems to enjoy it too--after the initial fight to sit down with me and get started. LOL The book of the photos of women reading looks awesome, Lark. I still need to give Elizabeth Gaskell a try.

    Thanks for sharing!

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    1. I started with Gaskell's shortest novel: Cranford. And it's lovely. And happy reading with your daughter! :)

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  6. I love Wives and Daughters, and yes, Molly does share a lot of characteristics with Fanny, and definitely Cynthia has some Mary Crawford qualities as well, and Roger some Edmund. Come to think of it, it is quite the Victorian Mansfield Park!

    I found Molly's stepmother, Hyacinth, to be one of the most aggravating characters in literature!

    Hope you read the book as well :)

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    1. I really want to...as soon as I clear the library decks. :)

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  7. "Women Who Read Are Dangerous" sounds like a wonderful book and not to mention a keeper. You know, I love checking out the art posts you upload everytime so please keep them coming! :)

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    1. Thanks! They're some of my favorite posts to do, so I'm glad that you enjoy them, too. :D

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